E-mail: Password:
                    Register For Free Newsletter | Forgot Password?
Latest News
REG announces developments at two US plants

Renewable Energy Group (REG) has finished upgrades to its 30 MMgy biodiesel biorefinery in Mason...
Read more >>

Evogene expands crop protection activities at Israel facility

Evogene, specialists in the improvement of crop productivity and economics for the food, feed...
Read more >>

Enerkem teams up with 3 Chinese companies

Enerkem has made three separate announcements relating to development plans in...
Read more >>

First Euro 6 dual fuel CNG vehicle to hit Europe

Howard Tenens and Prins Autogas are the first companies to successfully convert a Mercedes-Benz...
Read more >>


Subscribe to our RSS news feed


Visitor Poll

Do you agree with new policy that reduces taxes for US producers of renewable chemicals?








Upcoming Events
Tank Storage Germany
19 November 2014 - 20 November 2014
Hamburg, Germany
Read more >>
Tank Storage Middle East
26 January 2015 - 27 January 2015
Abu Dhabi, UAE
Read more >>
StocExpo 2015
17 March 2015 - 19 March 2015
Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Read more >>
F.O. Lichts Ethanol
3 November 2014 - 6 November 2014
Budapest, Hungary
Oils and Fats Asia
5 November 2014 - 7 November 2014
Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Fuels of the Future 2015
19 January 2015 - 20 January 2015
Berlin, Germany
National Biodiesel Conference 2015
19 January 2015 - 22 January 2015
Texas, USA

 

 
Volume 7, Issue 2

Feature: Second generation biofuel from a fifth generation bioreactor

The second generation production process is more complex than the first, largely because the carbon required is not present in a form that is easily available to microorganisms, such as starch or sugar.

Cellulose needs to first be cleaved in an enzymatic process. This makes the overall procedure a two phase process that consists of enzymatic hydrolysis to release the sugar followed by the actual fermentation. In order to accelerate the process and save on the expenditures involved in purchasing two different plants, efforts are being made to combine these two processes. This process with simultaneous hydrolysis and fermentation is called Simultaneous Saccharification and Fermentation (SSF).

The art of combining these two process steps is to design a bioreactor that meets the stringent requirements regarding the thorough mixing of solids during the hydrolysis step just as ideally as it provides perfect cultivation conditions and bioprocess control during the anaerobic fermentation.




Latest Issue
Latest Issue

Volume 8, Issue 5

View full issue contents >>

Go to shopping pages >>

 

 

Homepage | About Us | Magazine Store | Industry News | Global Events | Industry Jobs | Forum | Advertising | Contact | Register Free | Forgot Password?
Published by Horseshoe Media Ltd, Marshall House, 124 Middleton Road, Morden, Surrey. SM4 6RW
Registered in England No. 5635474. VAT GB 867 9796 31
Website Maintained by Fishbowl IT! All content and images copyright 2008 Horse Shoe Media Limited.